Chicago Songs
for orchestra with soprano solo

20:00
"Each intimate piece offered haunting and poetic musical lines for soprano that played against tightly focused and descriptive writing for strings and winds.”

Commissioned by the Sacramento Philharmonic, Chicago Songs is a five movement, twenty minute orchestral song set for soprano and orchestra. Premiered by soprano Marnie Breckenridge and the Sacramento Philharmonic. Premiere Performance November 2008 in Sacramento, CA. In a soprano/piano transcription, the work has been performed across the country.

Here Comes Trouble
for piano and orchestra

20:00

Here Comes Trouble is a two movement, twenty minute work for piano and orchestra. It was given its academic premiere in February 2009 by pianist Jerry Kuderna and the Diablo Valley College Philharmonic.

Ich und Du
3 songs for soprano and piano

Ich und Du was commissioned by San Francisco’s LIEDER ALIVE! as part of Erickson’s 2013-2016 Composer Residency. It was premiered in San Francisco in April 2014 by soprano Heidi Moss with the composer at the piano. The texts are taken from 19th-Century German poets Klaus Groth, Friedrich Hebbel, and Joseph von Eichendorff.

Four Andalusian Love Songs
4 songs for countertenor or mezzo soprano and piano

12:00
"...captured the spirit of the poems and established a lineage of emotional tone painting that Erickson has inherited from the songs of Franz Schubert."
— Rodney Punt, Huffington Post

Four Andalusian Love Songs was commissioned by countertenor Brian Asawa. It was premiered in a series of 2013-14 performances, with the first occurring at the Long Beach Universalist Church by countertenor Brian Asawa and pianist Mark Salters. The texts are taken from 11th-Century Andalusian poets Yusuf ibn Harun al-Ramadi, Ibn Hazm, Abu Bakr al-Turtushi, and Al-Asad Ibrahim ibn Billitah.

Song of Solace / Song of Regret
2 songs for soprano and piano

Song of Solace / Song of Regret was commissioned by San Francisco’s CMASH Ensemble. It was premiered on San Francisco’s Old First Concert Series in August 2012 by sopranos Ann Moss, Heidi Moss, and pianist Steven Bailey. The text is taken from M. Pound.

Jagermeisterlieder: A Song Set for Manly Men
3 songs for bass voice and piano

9:30

Jägermeisterlieder: A Songset for Manly Men was commissioned by San Francisco’s LIEDER ALIVE! as part of Erickson’s 2013-2016 Composer Residency. It was premiered in San Francisco in June 2014 by bass Kirk Eichelberger with the composer at the piano. The texts are taken from 19th Century German poet Eduard Morike and the 20th Century poet Rainer Baumbach.

Stud Pepper
for baritone and piano

Stud Pepper is a short witty song that has some fun with our society’s collective obsession with food and gourmet food culture. It was premiered in Sacramento in April 2015 by baritone Omari Tau with the composer at the piano. The text is an imagined advertisement for food and recipes.

The Fairest Wonders
for soprano and piano

3:30

The Fairest Wonder was commissioned by the Berkeley Poetry and Music Project. It was premiered in San Francisco in April 2015 by soprano Nanette McGuinness and pianist Dale Tsang. The text is from the German Holocaust poet Gertrud Kolmar.

Split My Heart
for countertenor and piano

Split My Heart from Four Andalusian Love Songs was commissioned by countertenor Brian Asawa. It was premiered in a series of 2013-14 performances, with the first occurring at the Long Beach Universalist Church by countertenor Brian Asawa and pianist Mark Salters. The texts are taken from 11th-Century Andalusian poets Yusuf ibn Harun al-Ramadi, Ibn Hazm, Abu Bakr al-Turtushi, and Al-Asad Ibrahim ibn Billitah.

The Rooster
for countertenor and piano

2:30
"ridiculously sly and silly accompaniment"
— Jason Victor Serinius, San Francisco Classical Voice

Rooster from Four Andalusian Love Songs was commissioned by countertenor Brian Asawa. It was premiered in a series of 2013-14 performances, with the first occurring at the Long Beach Universalist Church by countertenor Brian Asawa and pianist Mark Salters. The texts are taken from 11th-Century Andalusian poets Yusuf ibn Harun al-Ramadi, Ibn Hazm, Abu Bakr al-Turtushi, and Al-Asad Ibrahim ibn Billitah.